Primary Attainment – (Key Stage 2)

Overall

The percentage of pupils achieving Level 4 or above in both English and Mathematics at Key Stage 2 continues to rise.

Indeed, the percentage has now overtaken the averages for both the Core Cities and for our statistical neighbours, and is rapidly approaching the English average:

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in both English and maths (Bristol, 2010)  

Source: Bristol City Council

This is true of all four subjects (English, reading, writing and mathematics) – see next figure:

Percentage of pupils achieving Level 4 or better in Key Stage 2 tests

Source: Bristol City Council

Return to top

Black and minority ethnic pupils

It has been noted that nationally, dual heritage pupils achieve above the average at Key Stages 1 and 2 but fall to slightly below the average at Key Stage 4. It is also known that black children in particular under-perform at all levels. Both of these facts are certainly true in Bristol, as is clear from the following two figures:

KS2 Maths Test Pass Rates (Bristol 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

KS2 English Test Pass Rates (Bristol 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council

More specifically, over the last three years the following picture emerges with respect to white and BME attainment for each of the three main subject areas:

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in English Tests (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in Maths Tests (Bristol). 

Source: Bristol City Council

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in English and maths (Bristol) 

Source: Bristol City Council

Return to top

Gender Difference

Nationally, girls continue to outperform boys in most Key Stage 2 tests. At KS2 girls perform better than boys in English, and in the majority of Local Authorities for science and English and maths combined, but not in maths. See the following tables:

  Level 4 or above (KS2 tests) Level 5 or above (KS2 tests)
  Girls Boys All Girls Boys All
English 85 76 81 40 26 33
Reading 87 81 84 56 46 51
Writing 79 64 71 26 15 21
Maths 80 80 80 32 37 35
  Level 4 or above (KS2 assessments) Level 5 or above (KS2 assessments)
  Girls Boys All Girls Boys All
English 86 76 81 86 73 79
Maths 82 81 81 81 79 80
Science 86 84 85 82 79 80

Locally, in Bristol, the same pattern is repeated, and has done so for the last five years: 

Percentage of pupils achieving Level 4 or above in both English and mathematics in Key Stage 2, (Bristol 2006 – 2010)  

Source: Bristol City Council

There is clear evidence to show that at key stage 2 at least, boys are closing the gap with girls at English. Girls’ results would appear to have plateaued, whereas boys continue to show significant improvement. For maths, boys overtook girls in 2009 and maintained that gap in 2010.

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in English (left-hand chart) and Maths (right-hand chart), (Bristol, 2006 – 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council

Return to top

Special educational needs

Combining all SEN categories into one group, National Indicator 104 looks at the gap between those with Special Educational Needs and those that haven’t. The gap narrowed significantly in 2009 as is evident from the next chart:

The percentage point gap between pupils who are identified as having special educational needs who achieve level 4 or above in both English and Maths at Key Stage 2 and their peers (pupils who have not been identified as having special educational needs). 

Source: Bristol City Council

The graph below shows the gap between the two cohorts at a subject level, and also shows how few pupils with SEN achieve level 5 in either maths or English:

 KS2 Test Results and SEN (Bristol, 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council

The disparity in attainment rates between those that do and those that do not have SEN is starkly visible in the following figure:

Percentage of Pupils Achieving Level 4 or Better in English (left) and Maths (right), (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

Return to top

Free school meals eligibility

The map at on first page of this chapter (Figure 1) showed the correlation between deprivation and educational attainment. We can confirm this by analysing attainment rates in terms of eligibility for Free School Meal. Figure 34 below shows that it is indeed the case that those with FSM eligibility are more likely to underachieve.

KS2 Test Results and Eligibility to Receive Free School Meals (Bristol, 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

The gap between those eligible for free school meals and those that aren’t improved marginally for English (from 22.1 percentage points in 2008 to 21.4 in 2010). For maths the gap narrowed from 22.8 to 18.8 in the same period.

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in English (left-hand chart) and maths (right-hand chart), (Bristol, 2008 – 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council

Return to top

English as an alternative language

 Bristol is an increasingly multi-cultural and multilingual city. Since 2001 there has been a significant increase in the number of international migrants coming to live in Bristol, particularly Somali communities and Polish residents coming to work in Bristol following the expansion of the EU. In fact for pupils taking KS2 tests in 2010, there are some 50 different languages spoken as a first language.

 A higher proportion of pupils whose first language is English achieved the expected level or above in comparison to those with English as an additional language in each of the Key Stage 2 subject areas. The attainment gap is greatest in English and science assessments. In English, 80.7 percent of pupils whose first language is English achieved the expected level compared with 62.6 percent of pupils whose first language was not English (a gap of 18.1 percentage points). In science, 82.8 percent of pupils whose first language is English achieved the expected level compared with 66.4 percent of pupils whose first language was not English (a gap of 16.4 percentage points). The attainment gap is smallest for mathematics assessments where 80.3 percent of pupils whose first language is English achieved the expected level, compared with 68.2 percent of pupils whose first language was not English.

Comparison between those whose first language is English and those whose first language is other than English (Bristol, 2010)  

Source: Bristol City Council

Following significant improvements in 2009, there has been a deterioration in test results for those whose home language is not English. This is true for both English and maths.

Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or better in English (left-hand chart) and maths (right-hand chart), (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)  

Source: Bristol City Council

Return to top

Looked after children 

Analysis of the relatively small group of children that had been continuously looked after for at least 12 months reveals that Bristol’s LAC perform at a similar level to the national average with respect to KS2: 

Percentage of LAC scoring Level 4 or more at Key Stage 2 by subject (2009).  

Source: Bristol City Council

The trends for both English and Maths are positive: in 2000 only 21% scored Level 4 or better in English and 21% scored Level 4 in maths, whereas in 2009 the corresponding figures were 57% and 49% respectively.
Return to top
Return to the main ‘Enjoy and Achieve’ page.



This entry was posted in Enjoy & Achieve, Primary attainment. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s