Primary Attainment – (Key Stage 1)

Overall

In general, attainment levels for teacher assessments in reading, writing, maths and science have remained more or less constant over the last year (see figure below).

KS1 Teacher Assessments, Pupils Scoring Level 2 or better (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

Encouragingly, Bristol is now the best performing of all the Core Cities in all four of subject areas.

KS1 Teacher Assessments, Pupils Scoring Level 2 or better (Core Cities, 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council


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Gender difference

At Key Stage 1 boys outperform girls in all four subject areas. For those achieving the expected level (level 2 or better), girls are 6 percentage points ahead of boys in reading, 10 percentage points ahead in writing, 9 points ahead in maths, and 12 in English. 

Percentage of KS1 Pupils Achieving Level 2 or better in teacher assessments (Bristol, 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council

2010 was a better year for boys in terms of closing the gap. In all three subject areas girls’ performance declined and boys’ performance improved. This is reflected in the following graph:

Percentage of pupils achieving level 2 or better (Bristol, 2008 – 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council


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Black and minority ethnic pupils

Figure 13 shows a familiar pattern of underperformance by BME pupils, in particular the Black and Asian groups. Those with a Mixed/Dual background exceed the average, again imitating patterns seen elsewhere in this analysis.

Percentage of KS1 Pupils Achieving Level 2 or Better in teacher assessments (Bristol, 2010) 

Source: Bristol City Council

In 2010 assessments scores for Black pupils remained steady for reading and writing (at 76% and 70% respectively), but for maths there was a one percentage point drop (from 80% in 2009 to 79% in 2010) and science a larger drop of 7% (from 80% in 2009 to 73% in 2010.

Within the cohort of Black pupils there is a further disparity between girls and boys. Black girls outscore Black boys by 9, 20, 10 and 16 percentage points in reading, writing, maths and English respectively.

Looking at the last three years and grouping all BME pupils together, the following graphs (figures 14, 15 and 16) reveal a small downturn in BME attainment rates from 2009 to 2010.

Percentage of KS1 pupils achieving Level 2+ (left-hand graph) or Level 2b+ (right-hand graph) in reading, (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

Percentage of KS1 pupils achieving Level 2+ (left-hand graph) or Level 2b+ (right-hand graph) in writing, (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

Percentage of KS1 pupils achieving Level 2+ (left-hand graph) or Level 2b+ (right-hand graph) in mathematics, (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

An alternative way of looking at this data is displayed in figure 17, which combines reading, writing and mathematics into one graph, which shows the gaps between white and BME pupils:

Percentage of pupils achieving level 2 or better (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council


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English as an alternative language

Of the 4,062 pupils in the Key Stage 1 cohort, 699 (17.2%) do not use English as their main language at home, and this educational disadvantage is reflected in attainment scores as follows:

KS1 Teacher Assessments, Level 2 or Better (Bristol, 2010)

  Pupils whose first language is English Pupils whose first language is other than English
Reading 85% 75%
Writing 80% 70%
Maths 88% 80%
Science 89% 75%

For reading, the gap between those pupils whose home language is not English and those for whom it is has widened in the last year (from 7.9 to 10.3 percentage points). For writing there was a marginal improvement, the difference between the two cohorts changing from 11.1 to 10.7 percentage points. For maths the gap widened slightly from 7.3 to 7.8 percentage points.

Percentage of pupils achieving level 2 or better (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council


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Free school meals eligibility

For the whole of England, 23% of the 2010 cohort of Key Stage 1 pupils were eligible for free school meals. This figure varies widely from authority to authority, but in Bristol that figure was a similar 24% (in other words almost a quarter of all pupils). Those that were eligible for free schools meals significantly under achieved. Again looking at the percentage of pupils achieving the expected level, those that were eligible were 16.9, 17.8, 13.7 and 13 percentage points behind their ineligible counterparts for reading, writing, maths and science respectively.

There are, however, some signs that the educational inequality that exists between those eligible for free school meals and those that do not is improving, certainly for reading and writing. For reading the gap has come down from 20.3 percentage points in 2008 to 17.3 in 2009 and now stands at 16.9 (for those achieving level 2 or better). For writing this progression has been 21.7, 19.7 and 17.8 percentage points over the last three years. For maths there was a slight deterioration between 2009 and 2010, the gap being 16.6, 12.4 and now stands at 13.7 percentage points.

Percentage of pupils achieving level 2 or better (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council


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Special educational needs 

Results for pupils with SEN are below the results for pupils with no SEN. At KS1, results for pupils on school action and school action plus are below national results for similar pupils; results for pupils with a statement are slightly better than similar pupils nationally. 

Achievements at the expected level in Key Stage 1 teacher assessments by SEN provision (2010)

Source: Bristol City Council

Looking at attainment rates over the last three years it is noticeable that for reading, writing and maths the cohort of pupils designated ‘School Action’ has had a poor year (see figure 21). The gap between them and those with no SEN for reading has widened from 37.6 percentage points in 2008 to 45.1 in 2010. Similarly for writing, the gap over the same period now stands at 50.8 percentage points, having been 40.5 in 2008. The disparity for maths is much less, but the gap is worsening; having stood at 27.9 in 2008 it now stands at 34.2.

Percentage of pupils achieving level 2 or better (Bristol, 2008 – 2010)

Source: Bristol City Council


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